From Finding Them Gone by Red Pine



Looking For a Recluse and Finding Him Gone

Below the pines I ask the boy

he says his master has gone to find herbs

he’s somewhere on this mountain

but the clouds are too thick to know where

– Chia Tao,  (799-833)

Bill Porter’s (Red Pine) new book is a meditative tour of the grave sites and homes of China’s greatest poets, another one-of-a-kind journey by America’s most interesting Buddhist scholar and travel writer. It will be published in January 2016.





Inspired Graphic Art For The True Reader

Capturing sameness in the line.

Capturing sameness in the line.

Here’s the illustration by artist Hannah K. Lee for The New York Times‘ book review of Harold Bloom’s The Daemon Knows (a link can be found below this…). The book and the illustration are infused with capital A art. Read Lee’s illustration with the writers and poets in mind, and you will see what I mean.

Empson: The Heart of Standing

Butterfly Drawing by Jim Crump

Butterfly Drawing by Jim Crump



The language problem but you have to try.

Some solid ground for lying could she show?

The heart of standing is you cannot fly.

– A stanza from Aubade (1937) by William Empson

Basho & The Old Pond

Old pond

Frog jumps





A Woman of Bangkok: Epigraph

Louis MacNeice

Louis MacNeice

The sunlight on the garden

Hardens and grows cold.

We cannot catch the minutes

Within its nets of gold.

When all is told

We cannot ask for pardon.

The opening stanza of “The Sunlight On The Garden,” a poem by Louis MacNeice, used as the epigraph on Chapter I of A Woman of Bangkok by Jack Reynolds.

The Dewdrop World: Issa’s Classic Poem

Haiku written by Issa in his own calligraphy.

Haiku poems by Issa in his own calligraphy.

“The world of dew

is the world of dew.

And yet, and yet –”

Kobayashi Issa, 1763-1827


Haiku By Issa, (1763–1827)


Natural Circles, iPhone photograph by Roy Hamric


Mosquito at my ear –

does it think

I’m deaf?


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 215 other followers