Ralph Ellison’s Faux Haiku

Albert Murray, Ralph Ellison’s friend, remembers a short poem, which I will call a haiku, from their days as students together: Murray recalls the author of Invisible Man as the smartest-dressed upperclassman at Tuskegee.  Murray was impressed that Ellison always seemed to check out the best books in the library, and he presented a “nascent elegance” in his two-tone shoes, bow tie, contrasting slacks, and whatever else the best haberdasher in Oklahoma had to offer.

Ralph Ellison In Harlem

“I even remember the poetry Ralph wrote,” Murray said:

“‘Death is nothing, / Life is nothing, / How beautiful these two nothings!’ “


Epictetus on the senses

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“For as the carpenter’s material is wood, and that of the statuary is copper, so the matter of the art of living is each man’s life…

“The question at stake,” said Epictetus, “is no common one; it is this:—Are we in our senses, or are we not?”

– Excerpt From: Epictetus. “A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion.”


Emerson on books

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“Books are the best of things, well used; abused, among the worst. What is the right use? What is the one end which all means go to effect? They are for nothing but to inspire.

“I had better never see a book than to be warped by its attraction clean out of my own orbit, and made a satellite instead of a system.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson


Harrison writes about Red Pine

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Red Pine, Stonehouse and Gary Snyder are mentioned in Jim Harrison’s new trilogy of novellas that was just released, The Ancient Minstrel:

“After attending and giving at least a hundred poetry readings he could remember only one that struck him as a hundred percent genuine and honest. A poet named, simply enough, Red Pine read from an ancient Chinese poet he had translated, called Stonehouse. Red Pine read with quiet integrity just what he translated. Usually after a reading he was in a private snit and needed a drink, but now he walked down and looked at the harbor, his spine still tingling. The other true exception was Gary Snyder. He never wanted Snyder’s readings to end.”


Daylight

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Did you notice the daylight today?

The days are short in December.

It comes before dark. Sometimes it passes

in a hurry to get someplace else

More friendly perhaps. Fiji maybe.

We become forgetful and miss it some days.

In March there were six different warblers

in one willow bush. What else could

you possibly want from daylight?

– Jim Harrison, Dead Man’s Float


Finger Snapping Time

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Photograph of Blue Heron by Jesse Sublett

People can’t explain why they’re so crazy

The two evil birds on their faces

The three poison snakes in their hearts

One or another blocks their way

Making it hard to get hold of things

Lift your hand high and snap your fingers

Homage to the Buddha

– Poem #223 from The Collected Songs of Cold Mountain, translated from Chinese by Red Pine


First You Must Last

hemingway-boyhood-home-color2Ernest Hemingway’s boyhood home in Oak Park, Ill. “Il faut, d’abord, durer.” – (“First of all, one must endure.”) – A saying of Hemingway, from a letter.